The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) and the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have issued alerts regarding the record ocean temperatures in our state waters and the subsequent coral bleaching that is being observed. Unfortunately, these conditions are expected to last into November or December.  With your reports and monitoring by scientists and Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR),  DAR and NOAA aquatic biologists are able to record the extent of the bleaching and subsequent recovery or mortality.   For more information on the current bleaching alerts in Hawai‘i, visit NOAA coral bleaching website.

Thank you for reporting the coral bleaching occurring in your area. State aquatic biologists and scientists are monitoring reef conditions and compiling data. YOUR REPORT Is INVALUABLE and is providing much needed information. Please keep submitting reports as you see bleaching in new areas.  To make a report, use the form links on the top of the EOR website.

How do I report coral bleaching?

The Eyes of the Reef Reporting form might look a little intimidating at first, but it’s not really that bad, trust us! Your observations are very valuable to resource managers, so please take a moment to go though these images that were designed to help you understand what the form is asking. You can make a report any time you get in the water, whether you see bleaching or not – that is considered data too and managers want to hear about it! Thank you for your citizen science stewardship efforts! (more…)

Bleachapalooza! We need your help on Oct 3rd.


  • Please check nearby reefs and submit a report.  Healthy?  Bleached?
  • Send photographs to:

Why are Hawaii’s corals bleaching? 2015 FAQ

What is coral bleaching?

Coral bleaching is the loss of color from coral tissue allowing the white skeleton to show through.

Coral’s have an important relationship (symbiosis) with single-celled algae (zooxanthellae), which live in their tissues. The zooxanthella provides food for the coral and in return the coral provides a stable home for the algae. Most of the coral’s nutrition comes from the algae. Coral bleaching is the loss of color from the colony when the algae are expelled from the coral polyps and then the white coral skeleton is visible through the transparent coral tissue.

Partially bleached brown lobe coral (Porites evermanni)

Partially bleached brown lobe coral (Porites evermanni)

Close up of bleached coral polyps on brown lobe coral surrounded by healthy tissue

Close up of bleached coral polyps on brown lobe coral surrounded by healthy tissue

Why are our corals bleaching this year? (more…)

Spotlight on EOR volunteers: Peyton Williams

Peyton Williams

Mahalo Peyton for helping to care for Hawaii’s reefs!!

Peyton attended his first training with Eyes of the Reef about a year ago and he is now one of our EOR instructors!! Peyton has helped EOR tremendously by giving trainings and conducting outreach at many community events on Oahu. As a volunteer organization Eyes of the Reef depends on folks, like Peyton, to help promote coral reef conservation in Hawaii. Peyton hails from Charlottesville, VA, where he did graduate research in terrestrial ecology at the University of Georgia’s Savannah River Ecology Labs and was a member the UGA Institute of Ecology. He has held a variety of positions, including ecologist, Orange Co., VA, and environmental staff officer at the Army National Guard Environmental Office, Washington, D.C. As a volunteer, he has worked on a variety of projects for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and served as a Clean Water Captain, and trained Steward for CBF. He also was a trained Virginia Tree Steward. He is an active participant in REEF fish surveys and trained as a coral reef restorer with Coral Restoration Foundation. He currently works as a dive instructor at Dive Oahu.   (more…)

New article on black band disease on Kauai

BBD 2015 CD-Black band disease on Kauai 2015.  Click to download (more…)

Congratulations to the first class of EOR Primary Responders!


New article on coral health and marine managed areas

Click to download!

coral health paper

Marine Life ID Workshop!

Species Identification Flier

We need your help! Please attend an Eyes of the reef training this Friday (oct. 24) in Waikiki, Oahu

We need your help!  Please attend an EOR training this Friday Oct 24 from 6:30-8:30pm.  It will be at the Oahu Dive Center, Discovery Bay Center.

About Eyes of the Reef….

The Eyes of the Reef Network (EOR) is an effective statewide reporting system that enables all community members and ocean users to contribute to the long-term protection of our local reefs.

Pollution, climate change, poor land practices and increasing recreational and extractive activities create environmental conditions on coral reefs that foster coral disease and coral bleaching, support the spread of invasive species, and threaten reef health. Without initial sightings by the local “eyes” on our reefs, such occurrences may go unnoticed until it is too late.


EOR offers free trainings to give people with all levels of ocean knowledge – community members, reef users, tourists, fishers, commercial operators, scientists, and reef managers – the skills to identify and report threats to Hawai‘i’s reefs. We also offer local monitoring and educational support in your area. Contact your Island Coordinator to learn more about the programs available in your area.


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